Florida has plenty of them

Coyotes are showing up in more and more places across the United States. The dog-like creatures are native to much of the western parts of the country, and have made their way to Florida. They have since become an important part of the Florida ecosystem. They feed on things such as insects, rodents and vegetation. They can also pose a threat to any untended pets such as cats and small dogs.

Iguanas have been a big issue in Florida for many years as they are considered an invasive species. Ownership of the reptiles could soon become illegal in the sunshine state. A proposed bill in Tallahassee could ban the right to have certain exotic reptiles as pets, including the iguana. The bill is aimed at helping to reduce the population of invasive species that cause issues for residents and the local ecosystem.

For tips on animal control, check out Nuisance Wildlife Marshals.

Coyotes in Florida

Native to North America, the coyote, Canis latrans, is a medium-sized dog averaging 23 to 26 inches tall and weighing between 15 to 46 pounds. In Florida, average adult coyotes weigh about 28 pounds. Originally from the west, coyotes now occur throughout continental North America where humans persecuted and removed other predators such as the gray wolf, eastern wolf, red wolf, cougars and bears.

Coyotes prefer open grasslands where their main prey — rodents — proliferate. Coyotes live in small family groups dominated by a monogamous alpha male and female and their annual litter of pups. Learn more

Summary: Coyotes are showing up in more and more places across the United States. The dog-like creatures are native to much of the western parts of the country, and have made their way to Florida.

Could iguanas be banned in Florida?

A proposal that would ban ownership in Florida of more than a dozen exotic reptile species, including green iguanas, is plowing through Senate committees despite pleas from pet shop owners and breeders that it will kill a multi-million dollar industry.

The legislation, sponsored by Sen. Debbie Mayfield, R-Rockledge, is aimed at reducing populations of damaging invasive species in the wild and would prohibit their possession except for purposes that include education, research or eradication. Read more

Summary: Iguanas have been a big issue in Florida for many years as they are considered an invasive species. Ownership of the reptiles could soon become illegal in the sunshine state.