More rabies cases confirmed

Another case of rabies was reported after a raccoon bit the hand of a 15-year-old boy. Two days after the raccoon was sent to the state laboratory in Tampa, it was confirmed that the animal had rabies. So far, there have been ten confirmed cases of the virus in Polk County. Five cases were from bats and the other five were caused by raccoons. In 2018 there were only three confirmed cases.

A team of researchers have built a sensor-based camera system that could more clearly find Burmese pythons. It could aid in hunters’ search for the invasive snake in the Everglades. The devices are placed on a car as the team drives the roads through the Everglades, watching monitors that reveal a snake’s location. The image onscreen reveals a snake’s presence in a bright white light.

For more info on snake removal and raccoon control, visit Nuisance Wildlife Marshals.

10th rabies case confirmed after raccoon bites boy

he 10th rabies case in Polk County has been confirmed after a 15-year-old boy was bitten by a raccoon.

The Polk County Sheriff’s Office said the boy was bitten on Thursday, Nov. 14 in the Providence neighborhood in Davenport.

Two days after being sent to the state laboratory in Tampa, the raccoon was confirmed positive for rabies.

“It is imperative that children are told to avoid animals like bats, raccoons, and foxes out in the wild, and let me be clear — these animals are wildlife. Read more

Summary: Another case of rabies was reported after a raccoon bit the hand of a 15-year-old boy. There have been ten confirmed cases so far this year.

Team builds sensors that could help Everglades snake hunters

As Donna Kalil tracks pythons in the Everglades, she uses skills refined over more than 250 swamp hunts in three years to capture the snakes.

A team of researchers in Kissimmee hopes to add some high-tech options for python hunters like Kalil, including infrared cameras and perhaps even snake-seeking drones one day.

The team has developed a sensor-based camera system that could more clearly reveal the Burmese pythons to hunters working to eradicate the invasive species that has invaded the state’s River of Grass. Learn more

Summary: A team of researchers have built a sensor-based camera system that could more clearly find Burmese pythons. It could aid in hunters’ search for the invasive snake in the Everglades.