The disease has been detected in several animals

Workers in Florida began distributing edible vaccines last month to help combat the spread of the rabies virus. The vaccines were place around things like dumpsters, lakes and other waterways to hopefully attract animals that are common carriers of rabies, such as raccoons, foxes and coyotes. Officials reminded people that the vaccines are safe and not harmful to people or their pets. This effort is being made to help slow down the spread of the virus rather than cure it, as once symptoms set in, it cannot be cured.

In another part of Florida, a rabies alert has been extended after another raccoon was tested positive for rabies. Rabies is common amongst wildlife that is found in urban and suburban areas. Humans and pets can easily be exposed to the illness and need to seek treatment immediately after suspected exposure.

For information on safe raccoon removal, check out Nuisance Wildlife Marshals.

Wildlife Rabies Vaccination Effort In Miami-Dade

Miami-Dade County workers have started placing edible vaccines around dumpsters, lakes and waterways – in both rural and inhabited areas – to attract wildlife such as raccoons, foxes and coyotes.

The vaccine is safe and effective and not dangerous for people or pets. It increases immunity against the virus in wildlife and is a preventative, rather than curative, measure. Learn more

Summary: Workers in Florida began distributing edible vaccines last month to help combat the spread of the rabies virus. The vaccines are safe and not harmful to humans or pets.

Rabies-alert area expanded

A raccoon was found with rabies in the Lakeland Highlands area recently.

The Florida Department of Health in Polk County announced that it is extending a rabies alert into South Lakeland after a positive rabies test in a raccoon found in the Lakeland Highlands area.

The original alert on Nov. 18 included the Bartow and Loughman areas. Sixty days will be added to the initial alert.

See more

Summary: A rabies alert has been extended in one Florida county after another raccoon tested positive for rabies. Rabies is a potentially fatal disease for humans and animals.